LA PROMENADE-BELLERIVE
/ PINE BEACH / PARC
DU BOUT-DE-L’ÎLE /
NATATORIUM / ALLAN’S HILL
PARK / PARC ALEXANDRE-
BOURGEAU / PORT OF
MONTREAL / AVENUE FORTIN
/ ÎLE-GIRWOOD / 32E
AVENUE / HYDRO CORRIDOR
/ PARC-NATURE DU CAP-
SAINT-JACQUES / HYDRO
QUÉBEC / STADE OLYMPIQUE
/ PARC DE VERSAILLES
/ LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL
GARDENS / CARRIÈRE
LAFARGE / RUE HORTIE / YUL
/ PARC NICOLAS-VIEL / RUE
GRIFFITH / PARC ARTHUR-
THERRIEN / CEDAR AVENUE
/ AVENUE TROIE / CENTRE
MONTRÉAL PHONOGRAPHE
Recorded In Stereo By DOUGLAS MOFFAT
Now Available On 180 gram Heavy Weight White Vinyl.
Co-released by THE DIM COAST And ORAL
With A Special Text By DANIEL CANTY




MASTERING BY JAMES PLOTKIN
LACQUERS BY CHICAGO MASTERING SERVICE
PLATING BY MASTERCRAFT
PRESSED BY RIP_V
PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEREDITH CARRUTHERS
DESIGN by BLACK SHEEP DESIGN







This record is a rough approximation
of how the island of Montréal might sound if played on a vast turntable.
It is a record of what might be heard as a needle traces across the island’s varied surfaces, cuts through its snow banks and jumps its highway barriers. It is a document of a landscape transduced into sound.

A spiral trajectory was plotted across the island, from the wet edge of the coastline, across snowy November plots and inwards to the quiet centre of Parc Mont-Royal. Twenty-five sites were selected along a volute path sectioning the island into smaller and smaller segments.

Each mark of the pin on the map revealed its own ragged circle of terrain: a distinct amalgam of surface textures and weather conditions. A one-minute recording was executed at each site by moving a stylus across the chosen locations. A path was drawn across hard-packed snow, slick asphalt, spalling concrete, heavy mud, tidy brickwork, glassy ice and brittle leaves.

The rough-hewn, but sensitive, all-terrain stylus was built out of landscaping tools, plumbing parts and poplar lumber. The balsa-wood needle was shaped and mounted in an anti-shock chassis. The needle was fitted with a pair of contact microphones then jacked into the recorder.

The resulting twenty-five tracks have been lightly edited for this release. There is no post-processing, other than the ears of the artist, the mastering engineer and the engineer who cut the dub-plate, all who adjusted the equalization and final levels.

Montréal Phonographe becomes a kind of map, resisting the shifts of scale between physical observation and cartographic notation. Any attempt to navigate with this map demands that one stops and listens while every curve, crack and furrow
are revisited once more, in turn.